Most Versatile of G&L’s Bass Offerings

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Curious as to the group’s take as to which G&L bass is the most versatile

ASAT
1
4%
JB (4/5)
0
No votes
Kiloton (4/5)
0
No votes
L2000/2500
22
96%
LB-100
0
No votes
M2000
0
No votes
MJ-4/5
0
No votes
SB-1
0
No votes
SB-2
0
No votes
 
Total votes : 23

Re: Most Versatile of G&L’s Bass Offerings

Postby Cue Zephyr » Thu Mar 01, 2018 2:53 pm

I went with the L-2000 precisely for versatility. It sacrifices a little smoothness and subtlety you'd get from more traditional designs, but to me it's just a more contemporary sound that I really like.
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Re: Most Versatile of G&L’s Bass Offerings

Postby Ken Baker » Thu Mar 01, 2018 3:19 pm

thedukeofno wrote:I’ve personally never played an M2000 or an ASAT so I was curious what those owners thought. A different way around the “L2000 vs M2000” debate.


I guess I don't understand why there would be any debate. It's pretty clear by eyeball that the L and M Series basses are different. It's less clear by ear because of the MFDs. Both lines are pretty versatile, just in different ways. What you can get from the L Series can usually be had by EQ adjustments on the M Series. Granted you don't have passive mode on the M basses, but you also don't have the baggage that goes along with passive mode.

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Re: Most Versatile of G&L’s Bass Offerings

Postby thedukeofno » Fri Mar 02, 2018 1:16 am

Ken Baker wrote:
thedukeofno wrote:I’ve personally never played an M2000 or an ASAT so I was curious what those owners thought. A different way around the “L2000 vs M2000” debate.


I guess I don't understand why there would be any debate. It's pretty clear by eyeball that the L and M Series basses are different. It's less clear by ear because of the MFDs. Both lines are pretty versatile, just in different ways. What you can get from the L Series can usually be had by EQ adjustments on the M Series. Granted you don't have passive mode on the M basses, but you also don't have the baggage that goes along with passive mode.

Ken...


Interesting take. What do you feel is the baggage that goes along with passive mode? Is it specific to the L2000, or passive basses in general. Personally, I’ve found that I eventually grew tired of every active bass I’d owned, and ended up gravitating back to passive, particularly on my L2000.
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Re: Most Versatile of G&L’s Bass Offerings

Postby Nedmundo » Fri Mar 02, 2018 7:34 am

Ken Baker wrote:It's pretty clear by eyeball that the L and M Series basses are different. It's less clear by ear because of the MFDs. Both lines are pretty versatile, just in different ways. What you can get from the L Series can usually be had by EQ adjustments on the M Series.


I agree with this. Despite their different approaches, the L and M both have that core MFD intensity, and thus lots of overlap tonally. I do wish the M had a passive mode.
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Re: Most Versatile of G&L’s Bass Offerings

Postby Ken Baker » Fri Mar 02, 2018 7:57 am

thedukeofno wrote:Interesting take. What do you feel is the baggage that goes along with passive mode? Is it specific to the L2000, or passive basses in general. Personally, I’ve found that I eventually grew tired of every active bass I’d owned, and ended up gravitating back to passive, particularly on my L2000.


The baggage is the (relatively) high output impedance that is presented to an amplifier, and this would be true for pretty much any passive instrument. This creates potential problems where, if the cable is longer than about 12 feet, capacitance from the cable can have an effect on the tone. If you come out of the bass and go to an outboard device that presents a low impedance to the amp, then the problem kind of goes away though you still need to keep that cable from the bass to the device short.

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Re: Most Versatile of G&L’s Bass Offerings

Postby thedukeofno » Mon Mar 05, 2018 1:23 am

Ken Baker wrote:
The baggage is the (relatively) high output impedance that is presented to an amplifier, and this would be true for pretty much any passive instrument. This creates potential problems where, if the cable is longer than about 12 feet, capacitance from the cable can have an effect on the tone. If you come out of the bass and go to an outboard device that presents a low impedance to the amp, then the problem kind of goes away though you still need to keep that cable from the bass to the device short.

Ken...


Gotcha, the dreaded “tone suck”. Just wanted to make sure we were speaking the same language.
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Re: Most Versatile of G&L’s Bass Offerings

Postby TDR1138 » Mon Mar 05, 2018 10:22 am

Ken Baker wrote:The baggage is the (relatively) high output impedance that is presented to an amplifier, and this would be true for pretty much any passive instrument. This creates potential problems where, if the cable is longer than about 12 feet, capacitance from the cable can have an effect on the tone. If you come out of the bass and go to an outboard device that presents a low impedance to the amp, then the problem kind of goes away though you still need to keep that cable from the bass to the device short.


thedukeofno wrote:the dreaded “tone suck”.


IMO, this is the reason to use the preamp...
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Re: Most Versatile of G&L’s Bass Offerings

Postby Ken Baker » Mon Mar 05, 2018 7:13 pm

thedukeofno wrote:Gotcha, the dreaded “tone suck”. Just wanted to make sure we were speaking the same language.


That's the one!

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Re: Most Versatile of G&L’s Bass Offerings

Postby fatherska » Mon Mar 05, 2018 7:36 pm

Well, dukeofno, I suggest that you reconsider the question.

For 9 years, I gigged with an SB-1 and an L-1500. Alternating between the two, I experienced the advantage of the series/parallel switch on the L-1500. It made having the two basses actually like having three basses.

Even so, choosing which bass to play most often had to do with the condition of the strings on each.

For several years now, I've been content with just the L-1500. If that seems like a net loss of tonal options, then I'll get straight to the point:

The longer I've played bass (since 1984) and the more I embrace having just one - my desert-island bass strung with desert-island strings - the better a bassist I have become.

The versatility of the bass itself has gradually lost importance.

I love my L-1500 more today than ever before, not because of its versatility that I do value, but mainly because I've continued to become a better bassist playing it.

If you want to enjoy playing bass and making music, then focus not so much on the versatility of the instrument, but more on developing yourself as a bassist with your own well-chosen bass.
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Re: Most Versatile of G&L’s Bass Offerings

Postby thedukeofno » Tue Mar 06, 2018 12:19 am

fatherska wrote:Well, dukeofno, I suggest that you reconsider the question.

For 9 years, I gigged with an SB-1 and an L-1500. Alternating between the two, I experienced the advantage of the series/parallel switch on the L-1500. It made having the two basses actually like having three basses.

Even so, choosing which bass to play most often had to do with the condition of the strings on each.

For several years now, I've been content with just the L-1500. If that seems like a net loss of tonal options, then I'll get straight to the point:

The longer I've played bass (since 1984) and the more I embrace having just one - my desert-island bass strung with desert-island strings - the better a bassist I have become.

The versatility of the bass itself has gradually lost importance.

I love my L-1500 more today than ever before, not because of its versatility that I do value, but mainly because I've continued to become a better bassist playing it.

If you want to enjoy playing bass and making music, then focus not so much on the versatility of the instrument, but more on developing yourself as a bassist with your own well-chosen bass.


Different strokes, right? I’ve been playing since ‘86 and have had some basses come and go, but most have stayed. I enjoy having multiple instruments and consider them each pieces of artwork and craftsmanship. Unfortunately, I don’t keep them all readily available at my fingertips, but fortunately I do greatly enjoy becoming “reacquainted” with an instrument after not having seen or played it for some time.
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